1. Visual Neuroscience and Psychophysics
  2. Ocular Optics and Instrumentation
  3. Ophthalmic Assessments and Patient Outcomes following Ophthalmic Interventions
  4. Visual Development and Plasticity
  5. Ophthalmic Public Health
  6. Measurement Techniques in Vision
    1. Visual Neuroscience and Psychophysics
    2. Ocular Optics and Instrumentation
    3. Ophthalmic Assessments and Patient Outcomes following Ophthalmic Interventions
    4. Visual Development and Plasticity
    5. Ophthalmic Public Health
    6. Measurement Techniques in Vision
Vision

Centre for Applied Vision Research

The Centre for Applied Vision Research (CAVR) at the School of Health Sciences undertakes cutting-edge research spanning laboratory-based fundamental studies in vision to translational clinical research on the detection, diagnosis and management of vision disorders.

Our Research

Vision in Health and Disease

Research within the Vision in Health and Disease Group is concerned with how the eye and visual system are affected by ageing and disease. The group comprises a multidisciplinary team of scientists and clinicians whose interests lie primarily in chronic sight-threatening eye diseases of the elderly (particularly glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration), diabetic eye disease and developmental disorders in children. Current research includes improved methods of screening, evaluation of prevention and treatment strategies for eye disease and determining how best to deliver eye care from the clinical, economic and patient perspective.

Research Group

Professor John Barbur

Dr Alison Binns

Dr Tamsin Callaghan

Dr Peter Campbell

Dr Miriam Conway

Professor David Crabb

Dr Irene Ctori

Dr Simon Grant

Professor David Edgar

Alistair Fielder (Emeritus Professor)

Professor Christopher Tyler

Dr Byki Huntjens

Dr Peter Jones

Professor John Lawrenson

Dr Michael Powner

Dr Rakhee Shah

Dr Ahalya Subramanian

Dr Catherine Suttle

Dr Deanna Taylor

Professor Christopher Tyler

Measurement Techniques in Vision

The Measurement Techniques in Vision Group (Crabb Lab) consists of a mixture of researchers from optometry, psychology, mathematics, health economics and computer science.

We focus on measurement of vision through a multitude of methods such as assessment of visual fields, ophthalmic imaging, ocular movements and electrophysiology.

We relate stages of chronic eye disease and subsequent visual disability to everyday life. We design new tests for visual disorders, develop software to support clinical decisions and use ‘big data’ to assess the delivery of health services to patients with age related eye disease.

Research Group

Dr Alison Binns

Dr Tamsin Callaghan

Dr Peter Campbell

Professor David Crabb (Group Lead)

Professor David Edgar

Dr Peter Jones

Dr Deanna Taylor

Visual Neuroscience and Psychophysics

The disciplines within this group seek to explain mechanisms of vision from the retina to the cortex using a range of techniques based on the measurement of involuntary responses, brain imaging, behavioural studies and visual psychophysics.

The Visual Neuroscience labs study how cells along the visual pathway, from the photoreceptors of the retina to the neurons of the visual centres of the brain, process visual information. The work focuses on understanding the properties of visual mechanisms in a variety of species, using anatomical, biochemical, physiological and behaviourally based experimental techniques.

The majority of group members focus on the use of visual psychophysics to study the properties of both low and high level visual mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on studying subjects with damaged visual pathways and / or retinal and systemic diseases that affect vision. As a result, new tests that are specific for detecting early degradation of spatial vision, retinal inhibitory interactions, loss of chromatic sensitivity, binocular summation and motion perception have been developed and found important clinical applications. Improved understanding of the interaction of photoreceptor signals and the corresponding vision changes in the mesopic range led to new developments in lighting with direct application to residential streets.

Research Group

Professor John Barbur

Professor Ronald Douglas

Dr Simon Grant

Professor Michael Morgan

Dr Michael Powner

Dr Marisa Rodriguez-Carmona

Professor Joshua Solomon

Professor Christopher Tyler

Optics and Occupational Vision

The Optics and Occupational Vision (OOV) Group seeks to understand how the optics of the eye affects vision and how this impacts visual requirements in different occupational environments. Our current focus is on ophthalmic optics, smart lighting and the establishment of minimum requirements within visually-demanding occupations. The work of the group has expanded significantly during the last two decades by addressing both clinical and industrial needs with worldwide impact in several working environments. The work has resulted in advanced understanding of mesopic and colour vision as well as the design and evaluation of artificial corneas (keratoprostheses) and intraocular lens optics and the effects of scattered light. We also have an interest in how visual performance changes as a result of ‘normal‘aging, congenital colour deficiency and disease including the effects of blue light on the eye.

The group has developed novel Advanced Vision and Optometric Tests designed to enable accurate measurements of several aspects of vision that are considered important for particular occupations. For example the Colour Assessment and Diagnosis (CAD) test, developed by the group, is currently used throughout the world to assess pilots, firefighters, seafarers, police officers and air traffic controllers. The work of the group is has also led to changes in the minimum vision requirements for a number of occupations.

Advanced Vision and Optometric Tests

Research Group

Professor John Barbur

Dr Marisa Rodriguez-Carmona

Professor Chris Hull

Professor John Lawrenson

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